Gum Disease and Nutrient-Dense Food Supplements: Results of an In-Office Study

A guest post by Alvin Danenberg, D.D.S. in Well Being Journal, because your smile is important!

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Today, there is a 47 percent prevalence rate of periodontitis among adults in the United States. Periodontitis is the advanced stage of gum disease, where not only are the gums infected but the bone surrounding the roots of the teeth is infected and breaking down. For those who are over 65 years old, the prevalence rate jumps to 70 percent.

I have been a periodontist (a dentist who specializes in gum disease) for forty years. For the first thirty-five years, I treated advanced gum diseases the way most periodontists do: by performing traditional gum surgery, which was somewhat successful but relatively uncomfortable for patients. Several years ago, I learned a better way for my patients. In 2010, I became licensed in a laser procedure called LANAP® (Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure) that kills harmful bacteria, helps grow new bone, and creates overall better results without the use of a scalpel or sutures. Most important, patients don’t experience the pain or swelling that has been part of traditional gum surgery.

In 2013, I started to become educated about the importance of ancestral nutrition and nutrient-dense foods, and how they affect dental and overall health. I attended a five-day nutrition course for health professionals, held at Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health and, several months later, a four-day Food As Medicine conference. This education was life changing for me and has been life changing for many of my patients. I personally became reenergized, and I reengineered my periodontal practice.

With all this new information pertaining to lifestyle, I also wanted to know what science had to say about nutrient-dense, unprocessed foods specifically for gum disease. I researched PubMed, which is the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s database of published medical research from around the world. I found one study regarding gum disease and Paleolithic nutrition  and several recent studies involving nutrition and gum disease. However, I could find no studies on how specific nutrient-dense foods affected the progress of gum disease. So, in March of 2014, I decided to create a study using my own patients who wished to be a part of my research. I enlisted the help of Ramiel Nagel, researcher and author of Cure Tooth Decay, who designed the study with me. Now my research is completed, and the results are in.

Selection of Patients 
The specific criteria for patient selection were:

• The patient could not have been on any antibiotic during the last three months.

• The patient had not undergone active gum treatment (including deep cleaning or a general cleaning by the hygienist) in the last three months.

• Infected gum pockets (the spaces between the gum and tooth) bled when a periodontal probe (a gum-pocket measuring instrument) was gently inserted into the gum space.

• The gum pockets had a depth of at least 4 mm (1-3 mm without any bleeding while being measured with a periodontal probe is considered healthy).

• No more than four individual teeth per patient who met the criteria were selected for the study.

• Participants were instructed not to change any habits, lifestyle activities, dietary regimens, or medications during the course of the thirty-day study.

Results
We selected thirteen patients who met the criteria above for the study. They agreed to take a variety of nutrient-dense real food supplements for thirty days to find out if these supplements would be effective in reducing some of their manifestations of gum disease. I examined and measured 41 teeth within this group of thirteen patients.

I gave these patients three different nutrient-dense food supplements in capsule form, containing various micronutrients, which they took almost every day. The micronutrients are identified in websites referenced below.  A synergistic effect exists from taking this combination of supplements.

Full article … 

In the first clinical study of Juice Plus+ from a dental perspective, researchers at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom (full article) recently completed the clinical phase of their analysis of the impact of Juice Plus+ on measures of gum health in 60 adults. The results were impressive…